How to Teach Montessori Math at Home

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Montessori education at home is never complete without the introduction of math. It plays a crucial role in enhancing a child’s abilities, especially when it comes to numbers and counting. 

So how do you teach Montessori math at home? To effectively teach Montessori math at home, you should focus on helping kids learn about integers, fractions, and decimals before you worry about teaching them how to add or subtract. For the preschool, ensure that you have the effective materials that their absorbent minds can comprehend.

How to Teach Montessori Math at Home

Materials Used to Teach Montessori at Home

Base 10 Blocks

Base ten blocks are typically wooden cubes and rectangles. They can be used to teach many math concepts, including counting, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 

You can also use them to teach patterns, number bonds and skip-counting.

They’re an excellent resource for your child’s Montessori math at home because they’re durable enough to withstand hours of playtime without being destroyed or splintered into pieces by small hands.

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    Decimal Cards and Place Value Charts

    Decimal cards and place value charts are a must-have for any Montessori math at-home classroom. Their use is so intuitively obvious that it’s hard to believe they weren’t developed until the 20th century.

    Decimal cards are great for practicing addition and subtraction. When working with whole numbers and decimals, it’s essential to recognize which parts of the number represent units, tens, hundreds or thousands; these are known as place values. 

    Decimal cards help students practise this skill by reminding them where each number goes when adding or subtracting them together.

    Empty Hundred Chart

    The hundred charts are a visual representation of the base ten systems. It shows how numbers are related to each other in order and can help students understand how numbers work together. 

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    Numbers usually start at 1 and continue to infinity in math, but the Hundred Chart starts at 100 instead. 

    The idea is to show children that there are “hundreds” (100) of each number before they can count any higher; they must use their fingers to indicate this fact because we don’t say “10 hundreds” or “5 thousands.”

    Number Rods

    Number rods allow you to see each place value as a separate group, which can be very helpful for little ones who aren’t yet able to differentiate between groups on their own.

    Number rods can be used with any age group, but they’re handy for young children who may not yet be able to count themselves or add more than two numbers at once (such as 2+5). 

    How Is Math Taught in Montessori at Home

    In Montessori classrooms, parents are encouraged to play a significant role in their child’s education. 

    While the teacher will teach the class about math concepts, it is up to you as a parent or caregiver to help your child learn how to apply these ideas and work through problems independently. 

    You can do this by doing math activities with them at home, such as playing games that involve counting or ordering numbers.

    Teaching Montessori math at home will give your child more independence and confidence when it comes time for them to complete similar tasks in school; this also allows more one-on-one time with you.

    How Can I Encourage Math at Home

    Use Math Games 

    If you’re looking to keep your child engaged, playing a game involving numbers and patterns is a great way. 

    Make math a part of daily life. With all the time children spend watching, there’s no reason your kid can’t learn something new even when they’re not online.

    Use math in the kitchen. 

    When making dinner together or baking cookies, use measurements rather than estimating. 

    This will help your child understand how much each ingredient makes up every dish they eat or snack they make later in life; plus, it’s fun.

    Counting Beads

    Beads are an excellent way to introduce counting. They are also a fantastic tool for number recognition, as kids can easily recognize how many beads there are in each group. 

    There are several different ways of using them, from counting games to creating patterns and matching sets.

    Bead Chain Works

    Bead chain works are the perfect way to teach the concept of quantity. Each bead on the chain represents a certain number or value, allowing your child to visualize quantities in different ways without counting them all out.

    Numeral Cards

    Numeral cards can teach the numbers 1-10 and representational counting. Using numeral cards with another math activity will help children develop their number sense, foundational understanding of addition and subtraction, and confidence with numbers.

    After you teach a child how to count using these cards, they can use them independently to play games that involve addition and subtraction in greater depth than using them directly on an abacus would allow.

    Quantity Cards

    Quantity cards are a great way to teach your children the concept of quantity. 

    A quantity card is a picture that shows two or more objects, and it helps your child understand that there are different amounts of things in the world. 

    Quantity cards can teach the concept of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and fractions.

    Stamp Game

    The stamp game is a great activity to teach numbers. It can teach numerals, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. It can also be used to work on place value and number patterns.

    Have your child pick up their Montessori Material Tray with their left hand. Then have them drop the materials onto the floor at their feet while holding onto their tray with their right hand. 

    Once they have dropped one set of materials down on the floor in front of them, make sure they count out loud, so you know if they did it correctly. 

    Best Montessori Math Materials to Teach Montessori Math at Home

    When it comes to engaging in Montessori math activities at home, having the best Montessori math materials at hand can make all the difference. Here are some top-notch materials that foster mathematical exploration and learning in a Montessori-inspired environment:

    Number Rods: These colorful rods, varying in length, introduce children to the concept of quantity and length. They provide a hands-on experience for understanding numbers and their relative values.

    Sandpaper Numbers: With these tactile tools, children can not only visually recognize numbers but also trace their shapes, reinforcing both visual and kinesthetic learning.

    Spindle Boxes: This material allows children to explore the concept of quantity and develop their understanding of number sequencing. By sorting and counting colorful spindles into compartments, children can enhance their counting and one-to-one correspondence skills.

    Numbers and Counters: This versatile material comprises a set of numeral cards paired with corresponding counters. It enables children to associate numbers with quantities and practice counting independently.

    Golden Bead Material: The golden bead material is a key component of Montessori math education. It helps children grasp the concept of place value, understand the decimal system, and engage in hands-on operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

    Number Cards: These cards provide a visual representation of numbers and can be used for various math activities, such as matching numerals with quantities or arranging them in order.

    Stamp Game: The stamp game combines math and fun by allowing children to perform mathematical operations using colorful stamps. It strengthens their understanding of place value and reinforces addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division skills.

    Equation Slips: These slips feature equations that children can solve using Montessori math materials or manipulatives. They promote critical thinking, problem-solving, and the application of mathematical concepts in a practical context.

    With these Montessori math materials readily available, parents can create an enriching environment for their children to engage in hands-on mathematical exploration and cultivate a deep understanding of mathematical concepts.

    So how can we encourage math at home in a concrete way?

    Montessori math education follows a concrete to abstract approach, recognizing the importance of providing children with concrete experiences with math concepts.

    Through the use of hands-on learning and concrete materials, children engage in meaningful interactions with mathematical concepts before transitioning to abstract representations. This approach is especially beneficial in homeschooling and early math education, as it allows children to develop a solid foundation in mathematics.

    By offering children concrete experiences with math, such as manipulating Montessori math materials and engaging in hands-on activities, they can fully grasp mathematical concepts and build a strong understanding before moving on to abstract symbols and calculations.

    This approach fosters a deep and lasting comprehension of math, empowering children to develop a lifelong love for learning and a solid mathematical foundation.

    Summary

    We hope this article helped you understand the Montessori method of teaching math and gave you some ideas on using it at home. 

    Remember that the most effective way to benefit from Montessori is through hands-on activities that allow children to explore and discover their solutions. 

    When it comes to Montessori math at home, the best thing you can do is make sure that you’re following the guidelines that Montessori laid for a better result. 

    FAQs

    What is the best feature of the Montessori method of mathematics? Montessori makes math fun and interactive for kids of all ages and conditions.

    Is Montessori math effective? Yes, because it gives children visual and tactile representation of the numbers they are working with.

    Montessori education at home is never complete without the introduction of math. It plays a crucial role in enhancing a child’s abilities, especially when it comes to numbers and counting. 

    So how do you teach Montessori math at home? To effectively teach Montessori math at home, you should focus on helping kids learn about integers, fractions, and decimals before you worry about teaching them how to add or subtract. For the preschool, ensure that you have the effective materials that their absorbent minds can comprehend.

    Materials Used to Teach Montessori at Home

    Base 10 Blocks

    Base ten blocks are typically wooden cubes and rectangles. They can be used to teach many math concepts, including counting, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 

    You can also use them to teach patterns, number bonds and skip-counting.

    They’re an excellent resource for your child’s Montessori math at home because they’re durable enough to withstand hours of playtime without being destroyed or splintered into pieces by small hands.

    Decimal Cards and Place Value Charts

    Decimal cards and place value charts are a must-have for any Montessori math at-home classroom. Their use is so intuitively obvious that it’s hard to believe they weren’t developed until the 20th century.

    Decimal cards are great for practicing addition and subtraction. When working with whole numbers and decimals, it’s essential to recognize which parts of the number represent units, tens, hundreds or thousands; these are known as place values. 

    Decimal cards help students practise this skill by reminding them where each number goes when adding or subtracting them together.

    Empty Hundred Chart

    The hundred charts are a visual representation of the base ten systems. It shows how numbers are related to each other in order and can help students understand how numbers work together. 

    Numbers usually start at 1 and continue to infinity in math, but the Hundred Chart starts at 100 instead. 

    The idea is to show children that there are “hundreds” (100) of each number before they can count any higher; they must use their fingers to indicate this fact because we don’t say “10 hundreds” or “5 thousands.”

    Number Rods

    Number rods allow you to see each place value as a separate group, which can be very helpful for little ones who aren’t yet able to differentiate between groups on their own.

    Number rods can be used with any age group, but they’re handy for young children who may not yet be able to count themselves or add more than two numbers at once (such as 2+5). 

    How Is Math Taught in Montessori at Home

    In Montessori classrooms, parents are encouraged to play a significant role in their child’s education. 

    While the teacher will teach the class about math concepts, it is up to you as a parent or caregiver to help your child learn how to apply these ideas and work through problems independently. 

    You can do this by doing math activities with them at home, such as playing games that involve counting or ordering numbers.

    Teaching Montessori math at home will give your child more independence and confidence when it comes time for them to complete similar tasks in school; this also allows more one-on-one time with you.

    How Can I Encourage Math at Home

    Use Math Games 

    If you’re looking to keep your child engaged, playing a game involving numbers and patterns is a great way. 

    Make math a part of daily life. With all the time children spend watching, there’s no reason your kid can’t learn something new even when they’re not online.

    Use math in the kitchen. 

    When making dinner together or baking cookies, use measurements rather than estimating. 

    This will help your child understand how much each ingredient makes up every dish they eat or snack they make later in life; plus, it’s fun.

    Counting Beads

    Beads are an excellent way to introduce counting. They are also a fantastic tool for number recognition, as kids can easily recognize how many beads there are in each group. 

    There are several different ways of using them, from counting games to creating patterns and matching sets.

    Bead Chain Works

    Bead chain works are the perfect way to teach the concept of quantity. Each bead on the chain represents a certain number or value, allowing your child to visualize quantities in different ways without counting them all out.

    Numeral Cards

    Numeral cards can teach the numbers 1-10 and representational counting. Using numeral cards with another math activity will help children develop their number sense, foundational understanding of addition and subtraction, and confidence with numbers.

    After you teach a child how to count using these cards, they can use them independently to play games that involve addition and subtraction in greater depth than using them directly on an abacus would allow.

    Quantity Cards

    Quantity cards are a great way to teach your children the concept of quantity. 

    A quantity card is a picture that shows two or more objects, and it helps your child understand that there are different amounts of things in the world. 

    Quantity cards can teach the concept of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and fractions.

    Stamp Game

    The stamp game is a great activity to teach numbers. It can teach numerals, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. It can also be used to work on place value and number patterns.

    Have your child pick up their Montessori Material Tray with their left hand. Then have them drop the materials onto the floor at their feet while holding onto their tray with their right hand. 

    Once they have dropped one set of materials down on the floor in front of them, make sure they count out loud, so you know if they did it correctly. 

    Summary

    We hope this article helped you understand the Montessori method of teaching math and gave you some ideas on using it at home. 

    Remember that the most effective way to benefit from Montessori is through hands-on activities that allow children to explore and discover their solutions. 

    When it comes to Montessori math at home, the best thing you can do is make sure that you’re following the guidelines that Montessori laid for a better result. 

    FAQs

    What is the best feature of the Montessori method of mathematics? Montessori makes math fun and interactive for kids of all ages and conditions.

    Is Montessori math effective? Yes, because it gives children visual and tactile representation of the numbers they are working with.